Disabling Enabling- stop helping your loved one’s substance use

Disabling Enabling- stop helping your loved one’s substance use

Introduction

 

When I first heard the term “enabling”, I felt really sorry for the people who were classed as the “enablers”. It felt to me like a negative label attributed to someone that’s trying their best, day in, day out, to help someone they love with a substance misuse problem. “How mean”, I thought!

Now, I’ve realised that my attitude to this was all wrong. Enabling is unknowingly “making something possible or easier”. The family and friends of people who use drugs and alcohol go through a wide range of emotions themselves and are not trained therapists so end up trying anything and everything to help their loved one change. This is a perfectly natural reaction!

When a loved one shows signs of recovery or a glimmer of their old self and behaviours, a relaxed and sympathetic approach ensues. As they move back into their ‘selfish’ drinking or drug using behaviours, angry reactions are to be expected. If they put themselves in danger, panic, worry and desperate measures are called upon. It’s a rollercoaster of emotions every single day and if you’re in this situation, you’re just doing your best. See my blog on the cycle of change for more detail of the road to recovery.

 

What is enabling?

 

Disabling enabling is one of the four Vesta Programme principles. In my programme, we will tune you in to any ways in which you and others have perhaps been (unknowingly) making it a bit too easy for your loved one to drink or use drugs. Don’t worry! Everyone does this out of the love and care for their family.

In order for your loved one to change, we make a plan for this to stop these behaviours and replace them with better ones. Why? Because until you and others around your loved one stop “helping”, the chances of them stopping misusing drugs or alcohol are slim to none.

There is no judgement here. Enabling, helping or whatever you want to label it is a lovely, kind thing to do. It’s just not going to change anything.

 

Why does enabling matter?

 

If we want to influence substance misusing behaviour, there are a few things to consider. What does your loved one get out of their substance use? What do they like about it and what does it allow them to avoid? It’s important to think about these points as the benefits of their use. Secondly, what problems do drug and alcohol use cause them? What good things do they miss out on when they use or drink? These are the costs of their substance use.

If we focus on the problems that drugs and alcohol cause them, these are “punishing consequences” and include anything that makes them feel bad as a result of their substance use. Hangovers, missing work, shame, depression, aggression or health concerns. Each person will have different reactions to different consequences.

The important thing to remember is that in order to create change, the balance of the costs and the benefits of substance use needs to be shifted so that your loved one experiences ALL the natural consequences of their substance use. Your loved one needs to experience the full costs of their substance use.

If enabling takes place by anyone close to your loved one, they will continue to experience the more positive effects of their substance use. We need them to experience the negatives. It’s tough, but I can help you do this on the Vesta Programme.

 

Enabling behaviours

 

We’ve established what enabling is and why we need to stop doing it, but it’s important to understand what types of behaviour are enabling. It can be anything that reduces the painful consequences of their use, protecting them from other people’s judgements or reactions. Some examples of enabling behaviours are as follows:

  • Concealing a loved one’s substance use from family or friends
  • Paying off debts
  • Reparing damage to home or other posesisons
  • Defending them from criticism
  • Being around your loved one when they drink or use (regardless of your mood!)
  • Making excuses for them with work absence
  • Avoiding having your own life on order to help them

Can you recognise any? What might be the consequences of these behaviours for you and your loved one?

Remember that nobody is judging you here!

 

The benefits of disabling enabling

 

When we enable, we reduce the negative consequences of someone’s undesirable behaviour at a cost to ourselves. This means that instead of your loved one experiencing the cost of their own behaviour, you are! These costs manifest themselves physically, emotionally, financially and socially.

If you think about what has worked before while you have been helping your loved one in this way, what has changed? Not much? Perhaps it’s time to try a new approach.

Instead of living like this, imagine what it would be like to free up some of your headspace and concentrate on you?

In the Vesta Programme, I will help you to assess each enabling behaviour and we will work on stopping these. We will assess how comfortable and safe you feel stopping these behaviours and alongside the other programme principles I will help you to recover from your loved one’s substance use, live a better life and get your loved one into treatment.

I can help you!

 

I teach this and more in my Vesta Programme.My service, The Vesta Approach, supports families affected by a loved one’s substance use. You can access confidential support from me wherever you are in the world. I will help you to get your loved one into treatment and lead a better life. I offer face to face sessions in the Manchester (UK) area. You can also get help via Skype  and an online group therapeutic programme.Follow me on Twitter and FacebookSign up to my mailing list here to keep up to date with Vesta news and get my free 10 Steps to Family Recovery download.For a safe space to share your situation, go to my closed group, Vesta Confidential, where family members living with a substance user support each other and get lots of information and advice from me.

 

Take Care.

See you next week,

 

Victoria x

Liggy Webb: Resilience- how to bend not break under pressure

Liggy Webb: Resilience- how to bend not break under pressure

Introduction

Liggy Webb

I attended Liggy Webb’s Resilience Master Class in Manchester a few years ago and I’ve been a huge fan of her work ever since. I am so excited that she has agreed to guest blog for us. Liggy has worked all over the world supporting individuals and organisations through her amazing knowledge and specialism of this subject. She ignited my passion for the subject which I taught to staff and managers in the NHS at the time. See my blog “How the Circle of Influence can help you lead a better life”.

Resilience is such an important skill/behaviour/attitude to have in order for us to cope with difficult situations thrown our way. That’s not to say that we will always be resilient all of the time and in every situation! Learning how to “be” resilient is crucial when living with a problematic drug or alcohol user. Whether you are in this situation, a professional or a manager, read on…

 

The bamboo that bends is stronger than the oak that resists.

Japanese Proverb

 

What is resilience?

 

Some people describe resilience as the ability to bend instead of breaking when experiencing pressure or the ability to persevere and adapt when faced with challenges. These abilities help people to be more open and willing to take on new opportunities. In this way resilience is more than just survival, it is also about letting go and learning to grow.

 

Liggy’s work

 

Personally I find the topic of resilience fascinating and have spent the last few years deep in research exploring the habits and behaviors of resilient people.  In the work that I do with the United Nations travelling to some very challenged parts of the world I have had the opportunity to meet people from all walks of life.

For my latest book Resilience – How to cope when everything around you changes I interviewed over 100 people who had experienced varying degrees of set backs. From these interviews and various other research channels I was able to create a competency framework around resilience, developing a deep understanding of the necessary coping strategies for dealing with adversity.

Resilience- how to cope when everything around you changes

 

Personal experience

 

Then I was given a huge opportunity to personally put my knowledge and the strategies that I had designed to the test!

Two years ago, quite out of the blue after feeling very lethargic and out of sorts, I was diagnosed with a very rare tumour actually growing inside my heart. The prognosis was critical and open-heart surgery was the only way to proceed. For someone who is in good health and still in my forties it came as a huge shock. I guess we never really imagine things like this are going to happen to us until they do! The most significant thing that I learnt was that whilst we may not be able to control some of our circumstances, we can absolutely choose the way we respond to them.

I think in many ways I surprised myself, you never really know how you will react in these situations and it’s amazing how resourceful we can be when we need to.

I learnt so many things and I can honestly say it has certainly taught me a few things about recovery and indeed my own resilience. It was without doubt, life changing, with so many defining moments.

 

Top tips for resilience

 

Recently I was interviewed about my own experience with regards to recovery and asked to define the three most important resilience behaviors and this is what I concluded:

 

1. Accept your current situation

Let’s face it we all like to be in control, however, in some situations you have to put your trust in others hands and ask for help. For example, if we think of what we can control and what we can’t, we need to accept we cannot change the choices other people make. We can only change the way we behave. Sometimes acceptance of your situation and taking care of yourself is the best use of your energy.

 Tips for accepting your current situation

  • Remember acceptance is not about resignation, it is the recognition that fighting a situation that you cannot change may be a waste of personal resources
  • Acceptance will put you in state of flow which will help to reduce stress and anxiety
  • Learn that you cannot control other people’s choices

 

2. Take personal responsibility

Life can be very unpredictable and invariably we will all be subjected to various set backs and personal challenges. You can’t always control what happens to you in life.

You do however have total control about how you choose to respond to those situations. By taking personal responsibility for your reactions and attitude you will be far more empowered to cope and manage the ultimate outcome.

Tips for taking personal responsibility

Acknowledge that you are in total control of your response to any situation that presents itself to you

Be aware of the victim trap and focus on what you can do

Avoid the blame game and spend your time seeking solutions – spend your time instead seeking solutions

 

3. Be positive

Thinking positively is not about putting your head in the sand and being unrealistic, as some people may believe. With a positive attitude you can recognise the negative aspects of a situation and then make a conscious decision to focus instead on the hope and opportunity that is available. This releases you from getting locked in a paralysing loop of negative emotion and allows you to bounce back from adversity and challenging experiences.

Tips for seeing the glass half full

  • Try to make a conscious decision to challenge each negative thought and flip it over into a positive thought
  • Understand that every experience in your life whether it is good, or bad will bring a valuable lesson with it which will enable you to cope better in the future.
  • Remember that life is ultimately what you make of it and your attitude can have a huge impact on everything you experience

 

In summary

Being resilient takes effort and practice. It may well feel sometimes as if you are taking one step forwards and two steps back, almost as if you are doing a little dance with life. The key however is to keep moving and to not lose the faith that you can and will pull through if you remain positive and hopeful. The quicker that you can start recovering and bounce back, the better because life can pass so quickly and this is your golden opportunity to make the best and the most of it.

 

More information about resilience

 

Thanks so much to Liggy for writing a blog for us. You can access more information above.

For access to a complimentary life skills library email liggy@liggywebb.com

Click to access The Little Book of Resilience

Check out Liggy’s Website

Comment below about what you do to keep resilient.

 

I can help you!

 

I teach this and more in my Vesta Programme.

My service, The Vesta Approach, supports families affected by a loved one’s substance use. You can access confidential support from me wherever you are in the world. I will help you to get your loved one into treatment and lead a better life. I offer face to face sessions in the Manchester (UK) area. You can also get help via Skype  and an online group therapeutic programme.

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Sign up to my mailing list here to keep up to date with Vesta news and get my free 10 Steps to Family Recovery download.

For a safe space to share your situation, go to my closed group, Vesta Confidential, where family members living with a substance user support each other and get lots of information and advice from me.

Take Care.

See you next week,

 

Victoria x

 

www.vestaapproach.co.uk

 

 

The Child’s Change Cycle- how children feel during a parent’s recovery

The Child’s Change Cycle- how children feel during a parent’s recovery

The Child’s Change Cycle- how children feel during a parent’s recovery

I came across the Child’s Change Cycle in Fiona Harbin and Michael Murphy book, ‘Secret Lives: Growing with Substance Misuse – Working with children and young people affected by family substance misuse’ in 2006. It’s a fantastic book and in it they developed the Cycle of Change to add further context to it in terms of how children might feel during their parent’s recovery from substance misuse.

Last week, I wrote about the Cycle of Change- How to use it to support a loved one’s recovery. This was an introduction to the cycle of change and how to understand it to support a loved one’s recovery. This week, I’m taking it one step further to consider children on the change cycle. Here’s a reminder of what the Cycle of Change looks like.

Substance Misuse and Parenting

It is no surprise that parenting capacity is affected by a parent who is drinking or taking drugs. I do not like to drink in front of my children and I don’t like other people drinking around them either. Why? I know that after a couple of drinks, my guard is down and my parenting is not as good as it is when I’m not drinking. I also know that my tolerance levels these days are critically low, so I can feel the effects from one drink. I recognise that when adults drink around children, the conversation can change to inappropriate topics, swearing freely and that children can see a difference in adult behaviour when drinking (or have the time of their lives because they have fewer boundaries!). So wherever possible, I keep my own children away from it, especially as the noisiest person is most likely to be me!

It is important to remember here that SUBSTANCE USE DOES NOT MAKE PARENTS BAD PARENTS! How everyone manages their own use is up to them, I have formed my own view from fifteen years of working with children, young people and families and helping many of those families recover from parental substance use. Many people use substances and manage and function very well in their daily life, including in their parenting capacity. Many parents still go out at the weekend, ensure their children are safe and cared for and have a great time using recreational drugs or drinking and slip back into their routine when they’re done.

In my work, however, the parents I supported had significant problems with their use and there was not one child who has not known about their parents’ drug or alcohol use.

A friend of mine told me recently she had given up drinking when her son told her she drank too much. She described that this was a realisation for her and she decided to have a break months ago. She feels so good from giving up that she has continued. Is she an “alcoholic”? No. Was alcohol causing her some problems? Yes.

Children and the recovery cycle

It would make sense that when a parent stops drinking or using drugs, that everything in family life will be happy and there would be a great deal of positive changes. There will be positive changes but a parent stopping using is the very start of that change in a family. For a child, having a parent that is more present than they have been in a long time, perhaps actually parenting for the first or a long time can be confusing and needs to be handled with care.

So, Harbin and Murphy, created an additional layer to the Cycle of Change to reflect how children may feel at each stage of the cycle (diagram from Children and Young People affected by Parents’/Carers’ or Siblings’ Drug or Alcohol Misuse Guidance for Professionals)

child's change cycle

When a parent is in active use and has no intention of changing, a young person can experience neglect and emotional abuse. This sounds harsh, but in reality, when a parent’s priority is drugs or alcohol, their child is not. The relationship is affected and the child will not understand why.

In contemplation, a child has hope that things might change.

In preparation/decision, there is further hope but also anxiety about change.

In action/active change, this hope and anxiety increases.

Liane Goryl, who is the Manager of a Young Person’s Substance Misuse Service Cheshire West & Chester says, “If the parent is in the maintenance phase and living a substance free life, the young person will have been impacted upon during other stages of the parental cycle of change.  As the adult moves through the cycle of change, so does the child.  They experience their own worries and concerns which can impact on their mental wellbeing.  Even when the parent successfully stays in the maintenance phase, the young person can wonder why all of a sudden their parent is putting in boundaries and rules and interested in where that young person is.  This can contribute to a young person trying to regain control and pushing back and not obeying rules that are now being implemented by parents.  Where there are much younger siblings that have only known the parent to be drug free compared with an older brother or sister; it can be difficult for that teenager to understand why the parent could become substance free to look after that child but not them, causing an emotional response in the form or anger and depression”.

As Liane states, I have seen young people react in this way to their parent’s recovery. The shift easily moves to their behaviour rather than anyone actually considering the change for them and why their behaviour is occurring. I have sat in many child protection meetings which have focussed on the behaviour of a child without a connection being made that that behaviour is due to a parent’s substance use.  Please bear this in mind.

Lapse and Relapse cause disappointment, fear, confusion and sadness.

How can we help?

At each stage of the cycle, we need to consider where a child is at too. What are they thinking? How are they feeling? Families think they hide a loved one’s substance misuse well, but the best thing to do is speak to children in an age appropriate manner. A good starting point is to ask them how they are, what makes them happy and is there anything that makes them sad. I explain more about this in my blog Helping Children with a Drug and Alcohol Using Parent.

The thing to remember is not to feel guilty if you have children. The key with family support is communication. Talk to your children about the problem, create an open forum for them to talk and ask them how they are. Discuss any changes and make sure they have good quality time with you, your loved one and their friends and family. I always advise to let school know about the situation so that they have someone to talk to that they can trust outside the family. Use this model to establish how they might be feeling and work through those feelings. Not all children will feel the same but they need someone to talk to.

I can help you!

I teach this and more in my Vesta Programme.

My service, The Vesta Approach, supports families affected by a loved one’s substance use. You can access confidential support from me wherever you are in the world. I will help you to get your loved one into treatment and lead a better life. I offer face to face sessions in the Manchester (UK) area. Skype sessions are available as well as an online group therapeutic programme.

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Sign up to my mailing list here to keep up to date with Vesta news and get my free 10 Steps to Family Recovery download.

Take Care.

See you next week,

 

Victoria x

 

www.vestaapproach.co.uk

The Cycle of Change- how to use it to support a loved one’s recovery

The Cycle of Change- how to use it to support a loved one’s recovery

Any substance misuse worker worth their salt will use the Cycle of Change in their practice. Although it may make absolutely little sense to you at the moment, it’s easy to understand once explained. Better still, it has been successfully used to support people to change unhealthy or unfavourable habits since its development in 1982.

What is it?

James Prochaska and Carlo Di-Clemente developed The Transtheoretical Model /Wheel of Change in order to help people to make habitual behaviour changes in their lives such as with drug and alcohol use. It recognises that change doesn’t happen instantaneously. It’s not a one step process. In order to successfully change our behaviour, we need to go through certain stages.

Prochaska and Di-Clemente identified these stages. Stages 1-5 can be seen as a wheel or a cycle that people naturally go through several times before the change is seen as permanent, which is where they have maintained their change for a long period of time and have managed any temptation successfully. Why not buy their book, “Changing for Good”. 

 

Principles of the Cycle of Change

  1. A lapse can occur at any stage of the cycle.
  2. People can go through it several times before making sustained change.
  3. The cycle is a learning process and with each lapse or relapse comes a better understanding for all involved of what has worked and what hasn’t and what to focus on next time.
  4. Lapse or relapse is a natural part of the process and is not to be seen as failure.
  5. Identify where you think your loved one is at on the cycle and you can use certain techniques to move them onto the next stage of the cycle.
  6. There are many stages to change and it will not happen overnight.

 

How does it work?

As a family member who is living with a problematic drug or alcohol user, the Cycle of Change will be invaluable to helping you recognise what stage your loved one is at and what you can do to help. What better person to help move your loved one through the cycle is there than you? You are living with their substance use and although very skilled professionals use this model, there is no harm in you trying it out too.

Cycle of change

 

Lapse

Firstly, let’s talk about lapses AKA a “slip/blip”. What we mean by this is “a temporary failure”. Note the word “temporary”. In the Vesta Programme I teach how you can communicate with your loved one to influence their behaviour. Let’s be honest, the feelings of disappointment, anger and frustration probably haven’t allowed us to react productively to our loved one’s letting us down AGAIN! I hear you! Your reaction to a lapse is crucial to your loved one not having an excuse to go out and get intoxicated beyond recognition. Respond, don’t react. It is normal for anyone making a change to lapse. Check out the section about me below! What we need to try to do is accept it as a learning curve and prevent it from becoming a relapse, where they revert to their old behaviour.

 

Pre-Contemplation (not ready to change)

This is where your loved one has absolutely no intention of changing their behaviour. They may not have even considered that their substance use is causing problems or they may be burying their head in the sand and have gone back to square one. They do not intend to ta any action.

Trying to get your loved one in treatment at this stage is pointless as they are not ready to change.

If we were to put a timescale on this, they are probably not going to take action for the next six months.

What can you do to move them to Contemplation?

At this stage, you can acknowledge that your loved one doesn’t seem to be ready to change their behaviour. What you can do is speak to them about their current behaviour. It is important that this is done by them thinking about their own behaviour. Conversations like “I feel worried about your substance use sometimes. That time when you came in and I thought you had overdosed was scary for me to see. Maybe you could think about how to keep a bit safer when you’re using.” Let them know the decision to make any change is theirs.

 

Contemplation (thinking of changing)

This is the stage where your loved one is thinking about changing their behaviour. There is a lot you can do here. It is important though to avoid the temptation to push too hard

We would say here that your loved one is “ambivalent” about their change which means they are in two minds or 50/50. Tipping the balance here towards change being positive is your goal.

The timescale here is that they may be considering change within the next six months but definitely not considering change within the next month.

What can you do to move them to Preparation?

Discussions about benefits and costs of their drug and alcohol use is ideal at this stage as what we need to do is make sobriety more appealing than substance use. You could ask what they like about their substance use and what they don’t like. Ask them if the things they do like (positive reinforcers) about it are worth the negative consequences.

 

Preparation (Ready to Change)

This stage can be seen as an experimental stage where they are trying to change. They may have already made some small changes within the last 12 months.

They are planning to act within 1 month.

What can you do to move them to Action?

Encouragement and positivity is the key! More discussion about what they feel life would be like without their substance use. Encourage them to cut down just a little if they can and see what the change is like. Small steps are vital. It is imperative that along with the positivity, your loved one has realistic expectations. If change has happened before, think about what you learnt from it and what you will do this time if they have a lapse. Remind them that a lapse is not a failure but that you can both have a positive attitude towards lapses and move on from it. Encourage openness, honesty, trust and support.

Please note, your loved one is unlikely to achieve their goals by stopping substances on their own. On top of this, for substance such as alcohol or opiates, it can be extremely dangerous to do this without medical support. Look out for help available in your area.

It is worth looking at the options available for treatment and support at this stage.

 

Action (making changes)

This stage is where the magic happens! Your loved one will start to make changes around their substance use, including the environment. The environment is something that you influence yourself. I teach this on the Vesta Programme. For example, when your loved one is sober, it is time to make them realise that they are missing out on so much when they are using. Reward them with affection, love, their favourite meal. A day out with the children. Obviously, this needs to be within your means but you can make a list of what they like, what you used to enjoy doing together and do them! The idea here is to show your loved one how good and enjoyable life can be without drugs or alcohol.

What can you do to move them into Maintenance?

Usually at this stage, significant changes have been made over the last 3-6 months. Look out for potential relapse triggers such as them wanting to associate with drug or alcohol using peers. They may think they have the confidence to say no to their substances but certain people in certain environments can be triggers. Talk this through with them. Remember though, it is not your responsibility to make choices or police them. You can only influence them and remain realistically positive!

Increasing social recovery capital here is really beneficial. This can include reconnecting with family and old friends and also, through recovery networks such as AA, NA or SMART Recovery. This goes for you too! I have plenty of support for family members supporting their loved ones through recovery.

 

Maintenance (sticking with the change)

Your loved one has maintained their change for a long period of time and has avoided relapse. They may have lapsed but they have been in tempting situations and have not relapsed into their own behaviours. Their confidence has increased and they have other interests in their lives other than drugs or alcohol which they enjoy.

What can you do to make the change permanent?

They may have completed any specific treatment for their substance use at this stage, but if possible, it is great for people in recovery to continue with follow up support where possible. The same discussions can be had around relapse at this stage and a continuation of support, praise and positivity will now be coming more naturally to you!

If you can, discuss with your loved one about potentially using again and the fact that if they ever choose to, to be aware that they will not require the same dose as what they have used before. A long period of time off drugs or alcohol means their tolerance will be low or non-existent so they will need much less of the same drug or drink.

People can be in this stage for 6months to 5 years before the change is permanent. Some people are here for longer.

 

Relapse

This stage of the cycle has been added in at a later date but basically means that your loved one has returned to their old substance using behaviours. This is a likely part of the cycle so try not to be disappointed! People will often relapse several times before they create a permanent change.

It is important at this point to recognise what stage they are at on the cycle and work with them again to encourage them back to action. Remember to take each stage at a time and remind them frequently about how well they have done before and that when they are ready, they can use the brilliant learning they have to do even better next time.

You can review why they relapsed and what the triggers were and plan in the future how they can do even better to prevent themselves from relapsing.

Barack Obama Change

 

Applying the model to ourselves!

The good thing about the cycle of change is that we can usually apply it to a change we have made  ourselves and this is the best way to understand it. For example, I think I’ve been dieting on and off now for 15 years (no joke!). I have been through this cycle many times! So…

Pre-contemplation

– could be the run up to Christmas where I think, “Ah forget it!” and stuff my face with whatever’s going.

Contemplation

– is Boxing Day where I think, “Right, well I’ll continue stuffing my face but I might be up for stopping at some point”. “Then again, I might not”.

Preparation

– is where I’m standing on the scales on New Year’s Day and I’m like, “Oh man, I need to do something about this. I’m ringing Karen from Slimming World immediately. Tim will have to put the kids to bed so I can go to group next week”.

Action

– It’s Wednesday night and I’ve psyched myself up, I’m here. Let’s face the music and get on those scales. Ooh! I’ve put 9 pounds on in two weeks. Right. That’s ok. I’m here now so I’ll plan my meals, go shopping and stick to my meal plan. I will make sure my environment at home is right and I train myself to say no to temptation. I’ve done it before so I know tiredness and stress are my triggers (other than celebrations) so I’ll make sure I go to bed on time and get 7.5 hours sleep. I’m also going to do my mindfulness app and walk the dog every morning as exercise sets me up for the day.

Maintenance

– Yes! My 2 stone award I’m doing well! I’ve been great for ages.

Lapse

– Oh dear. I’ve been really tired and craving sugar so I ate 10 biscuits and now I’m worried I won’t stop! Am I going to carry on eating sugar and relapse or am I going to stop???

So, let’s just remember that we have our own experiences with change. This model is fantastic to apply to any change we want to make, as long as we remember that change takes time!

I can help you!

I teach this and more in my Vesta Programme.

My service, The Vesta Approach, supports families affected by a loved one’s substance use. You can access confidential support from me wherever you are in the world. I will help you to get your loved one into treatment and lead a better life. I offer face to face sessions in the Manchester (UK) area. Skype sessions are available and an online group therapeutic programme.

Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Sign up to my mailing list here to keep up to date with Vesta news and get my free 10 Steps to Family Recovery download.

Take Care.

See you next week,

 

Victoria x

 

www.vestaapproach.co.uk